Maurice Glasman, Baron Glasman

Otis dozing in the afternoon sun

Otis dozing in the afternoon sun (Photo credit: IntelGuy)

Maurice Glasman, Baron Glasman (born 8 March 1961) is an English academic, social thinker and Labour life peer in the House of Lords. He is best known as the originator of Blue Labour, a term he coined in 2009.

Glasman was born in Walthamstow north-east London,[1] into a Jewish family. His father Collie Glasman had a small toy manufacturing business that eventually collapsed, his mother Rivie Glasman, the daughter of a poor family of Stamford Hill, was a life long Labour supporter.[2] Glasman was educated at Clapton Jewish Day School and the Jews‘ Free School (JFS) from where he won an exhibition to study Modern History at St Catharine’s College, Cambridge.

A trumpeter, he became a jazz musician for four years and then gained an MA in Political Philosophy at the University of York and a PhD at the European University Institute in Florence with a thesis on the German social market economy,[2] published in 1996 under the title Unnecessary Suffering.[4] Glasman cites political thinkers from Aristotle to the Hungarian economist and sociologist Karl Polanyi as major influences on his politics.[5]

English Defence League
English Defence League (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Glasman was a professor at Johns Hopkins University’s European centre in Bologna. After his father’s death in 1995 he returned to the UK.[2] He is a senior lecturer in Political Theory at London Metropolitan University, and Director of its Faith and Citizenship Programme. According to his website, „his research interests focus on the relationship between citizenship and faith and the limits of the market“.[1] On 19 November 2010, it was announced that he would be created a life peer.[6] Prior to his elevation he worked for ten years with London Citizens and through this developed an expertise in community organising. On 4 February 2011, he was created Baron Glasman, of Stoke Newington and of Stamford Hill in the London Borough of Hackney, and was introduced in the House of Lords on 8 March 2011, where he sits on the Labour benches. His elevation to the Lords was considered something of a surprise, with Glasman admitting that he was „completely shocked“ by the appointment.[5]

Having joined the Labour Party in 1976, Glasman re-engaged with Labour politics after his mother’s death in 2008. Glasman coined the term ‚Blue Labour‘,[7] defined by Glasman as a small-c conservative form of socialism which advocates a return to the roots of the pre-1945 Labour Party by encouraging the political involvement of voluntary groups from trade unions through churches to football clubs.[5] In a critical assessment of Glasman’s political philosophy, Alan Finlayson, asserts that Glasman emphasises ethical social institution rather than moral individualism, criticises commodification and the money economy and seeks to revive the concept of the ‚common good‘ at the forefront of British politics.[8] Glasman’s role in the creation and promotion of ‚Blue Labour‘ is described in the book Tangled Up in Blue (2011) by Rowenna Davis.[9]

English: Isaac Newton Dansk: Sir Isaac Newton ...

English: Isaac Newton Dansk: Sir Isaac Newton Français : Newton (1642-1727) Bahasa Indonesia: Issac Newton saat berusia 46 tahun pada lukisan karya Godfrey Kneller tahun 1689 Lietuvių: Seras Izaokas Niutonas 1689-aisiais Македонски: Сер Исак Њутн на возраст од 46 години (1689) Nederlands: Newton geboren 4 januari 1643 Türkçe: Sir Isaac Newton. (ö. 20 Mart 1727) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In April 2011, Glasman called on the Labour Party to establish a dialogue with sympathisers of the far-right English Defence League (EDL), in order „to build a party that brokers a common good, that involves those people who support the EDL within our party. Not dominant in the party, not setting the tone of the party, but just a reconnection with those people that we can represent a better life for them, because that’s what they want“.[10]

In July 2011, Glasman called for all immigration to be temporarily halted and for the right of free movement of labour, a key provision of the Treaty of Rome to be abrogated.[11][12] Following these comments, Blue Labour lost its influence in the Labour Party.[13]

Emphasising that Israel should not be ‘demonised’, Glasman says he does not like Israel, where, in his opinion, “terrible things [are] going on”, adding that “the Jewish settler movement is as bad as Islamic jihadist supremacists. What I see with jihadists and settlers is nationalist domination, and yuck is my general verdict”.[14] However, he accepted the visiting professorship he was offered by Haifa University, telling the Jewish Cronicle: “If people I know say they want to boycott Israel, I say they should start by boycotting me”.

This image was selected as a picture of the we...

This image was selected as a picture of the week on the Malay Wikipedia for the 48th week, 2009. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Glasman is a supporter of Jewish tradition, regularly goes to a synagogue on Shabbat,[3] and is a founder member of Stoke Newington New Shul, a synagogue affiliated with the Masorti movement.[15] His wife Catherine has also become “engaged with Judaism”. According to The Jewish Cronicle, they keep kosher and celebrate Shabbat.[3] He plays the trumpet and smokes roll-ups.[16] He lives with his wife and their four children in a flat over a clothing shop in Stoke Newington in north London.[2]

Publications

English: Children labour in the world Français...

English: Children labour in the world Français : Pyramide du travail des enfants dans le monde (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Maurice Glasman, Jonathan Rutherford, Marc Stears and Stuart White, ed. (2011). The Labour Tradition and the Politics of Paradox: The Oxford London Seminars 2010-11. The Oxford-London Seminars. Soundings Journal.
Maurice Glasman (Winter 2010). „Labour as a radical tradition“. Soundings, Number 46. pp. 31-41.
(8 November 2008). The Secret of Obama’s success.
(4 February 2006). Losing Your Rag.
(1996). Unnecessary Suffering: Managing Market Utopia. Verso.
(May/June 1994). „The Great Deformation: Polanyi, Poland, and the Terrors of Planned Spontaneity“.
[edit]
References
^ a b „Dr Maurice Glasman. Senior Lecturer in Political Theory“. London Metropolitan University. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c d Stephen Moss (19 July 2011). „Lord Glasman: ‚I’m a radical traditionalist'“. The Guardian. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c d Michael Freedland (30 June 2011). „Interview: Maurice Glasman. My vision for Labour – and it’s all down to mum“. The Jewish Chronicle. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ Maurice Glasman (1 August 2011). „“I didn’t go into politics to be a hero to the Mail““. New Statesman. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c Toby Helm; Julian Coman (16 January 2011). „Maurice Glasman–the peer plotting Labour’s new strategy from his flat“. The Observer. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ „Latest Peerages announced“. 10 Downing Street. 19 November 2010. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ „Labour: Now it’s kind of blue“. The Guardian Politics Blog. 24 April 2009. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ Alan Finlayson (27 May 2011). „Should the left go Blue? Making sense of Maurice Glasman“. openDemocracy. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c d Stephen Moss (19 July 2011). „Lord Glasman: ‚I’m a radical traditionalist'“. The Guardian. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c d Michael Freedland (30 June 2011). „Interview: Maurice Glasman. My vision for Labour – and it’s all down to mum“. The Jewish Chronicle. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ Maurice Glasman (1 August 2011). „“I didn’t go into politics to be a hero to the Mail““. New Statesman. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ a b c Toby Helm; Julian Coman (16 January 2011). „Maurice Glasman–the peer plotting Labour’s new strategy from his flat“. The Observer. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ „Latest Peerages announced“. 10 Downing Street. 19 November 2010. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ „Labour: Now it’s kind of blue“. The Guardian Politics Blog. 24 April 2009. Retrieved 10 February 2011.
^ Alan Finlayson (27 May 2011). „Should the left go Blue? Making sense of Maurice Glasman“. openDemocracy. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ Rowenna Davis (23 September 2011). „Lord Glasman, the Blue Labour thinker who crosses party’s red lines“. The Guardian. Retrieved 21 November 2011.
^ Robert Philpot (19 April 2011). „Labour isn’t working“. Progress. Retrieved 22 April 2011.
^ Mary Riddell, and Tom Whitehead (18 July 2011). „Immigration should be frozen, says Miliband adviser“. Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 20 June 2012.
^ Macer Hall (19 July 2011). „Britain Must Ban Migrants“. Daily Express. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ Dan Hodges (20 July 2011). „Exclusive: the end of Blue Labour“. New Statesman. Retrieved 16 June 2012.
^ Mary Riddell (Summer 2011). „The Fabian Interview: Maurice Glasman. Way to Blue“. Fabian Review. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ „Yom Masorti“. masorti.org.uk. 22 April 2012. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
^ „Analysis Blue Labour, Transcript of a Recorded Documentary“. BBC. 21 March 2011. Retrieved 18 May 2012.
[edit]
External links Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Maurice Glasman, Baron Glasman

Personal page at London Metropolitan University
Blog
„Confronting the City“, Mat Little, Red Pepper (November 2009): profile of Glasman
„The City of London and its Tax Haven Empire“: presentation by Nicholas Shaxson and Maurice Glasman at the LSE, 1 February 2011. Glasman begins speaking approximately 31 min into the recording, and jointly answers questions after the 54 min mark.

Categories: 1961 births
20th-century philosophers
21st-century philosophers
Academics of London Metropolitan University
Alumni of St Catharine’s College, Cambridge
Alumni of the University of York
Blue Labour
English political theorists
English Jews
English political philosophers
English political scientists
Labour Party (UK) life peers
Living people
People from Walthamstow

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