David Friedländer

David Friedländer

David Friedländer (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

David Friedländer, sometimes spelled Friedlander (16 December 1750, Königsberg – 25 December 1834, Berlin) was a German Jewish banker, writer and communal leader.

Friedländer settled in Berlin in 1771. As the son-in-law of the rich banker Daniel Itzig, and a friend, pupil, and subsequently intellectual successor of Moses Mendelssohn, he occupied a prominent position in both Jewish and non-Jewish circles of Berlin. His endeavors on behalf of the Jews and Judaism included the emancipation of the Jews of Berlin and the various reforms connected therewith. Frederick William II, on his accession, called a committee whose duty was to acquaint him with the grievances of the Jews, Friedländer and Itzig being chosen as general delegates. But the results of the conference were such that the Jews declared themselves unable to accept the reforms proposed, and not until after the French Revolution, with the edict of March 11, 1812, did the Jews then living on Prussian territory succeed in obtaining equal rights from Frederick William III.

Friedländer and his friends in the community of Berlin now turned their attention to the reform of worship in harmony with modern ideas and the changed social position of the Jews. The proposition in itself was perfectly justified, but the propositions of Friedländer, who had meanwhile been called (1813) to the conferences on the reorganization of the Jewish cult held in the Jewish consistory at Cassel, were unacceptable to even the most radical members, as they tended to reduce Judaism to a mere colorless code of ethics.

Deutsch: Daniel Itzig (* 18. März 1723 in Berl...

Deutsch: Daniel Itzig (* 18. März 1723 in Berlin; ? 17. Mai 1799 Potsdam), königlich preußischer Hoffaktor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friedländer was more successful in his educational endeavors. He was one of the founders of a Jewish free school (1778), which he directed in association with his brother-in-law, Isaac Daniel Itzig. In this school, however, exclusively Jewish subjects were soon crowded out. Friedländer also wrote text-books, and was one of the first to translate the Hebrew prayer-book into German.

The „dry baptism“ initiative

Heinrich Graetz, (1817-1891): his magnum opus ...

Heinrich Graetz, (1817-1891): his magnum opus History of the Jews was written in the spirit of Wissenschaft des Judentums (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friedländer was concerned with endeavors to facilitate for himself and other Jews entry into Christian circles. This disposition was evidenced in 1799 by his radical proposal to a leading Protestant provost in Berlin (Oberconsistorialrat) Wilhelm Teller. Friedländer’s open letter (Sendschreiben) „in the name of some Jewish heads of families,“ stated that Jews would be ready to undergo „dry baptism“: join the Lutheran Church on the basis of shared moral values if they were not required to believe in the divinity of Jesus and might evade certain Christian ceremonies. Much of the Open Letter was a polemic arguing that the Mosaic rituals were largely obsolete. So Judaism would thereby in return abandon many of its ceremonial features. The proposal „envisioned the establishment of a confederated unitarian church-synagogue.“[1]

A picture of Moses Mendelssohn displayed in th...

A picture of Moses Mendelssohn displayed in the Jewish Museum, Berlin, based on an oil portrait (1771) by Anton Graff in the collection of the University of Leipzig. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

This „Sendschreiben an Seine Hochwürden Herrn Oberconsistorialrath und Probst Teller zu Berlin, von einigen Hausvätern Jüdischer Religion“ (Berlin, 1799), elicited over a score of responses in pamphlets and the popular press, including ones from Abraham Teller and Friedrich Schleiermacher. Both rejected the notion of a sham conversion to Christianity as harmful to Christianity and the State, though, in line with Enlightenment values, neither precluded the idea of more civil rights for unconverted Jews. Jewish reaction on Friedländer’s initiative was overwhelmingly hostile, and it was called „a dishonorable act“ and „desertion“. Heinrich Graetz called him an „ape“.

Jews praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (...

Jews praying in the Synagogue on Yom Kippur. (1878 painting by Maurycy Gottlieb) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1816, when the Prussian government decided to improve the situation of the Polish Jews, Franciszek Malczewski (Malziewsky), Bishop of Kujawy, consulted Friedländer. Friedländer gave the bishop a circumstantial account of the material and intellectual condition of the Jews, and indicated the means by which it might be ameliorated.

Literary career

Royal Monogram of King Frederick William III o...

Royal Monogram of King Frederick William III of Prussia (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friedländer displayed great activity in literary work. Induced by Moses Mendelssohn, he began the translation into German of some parts of the Bible according to Mendelssohn’s commentary. He translated Mendelssohn’s „Sefer ha-Nefesh,“ Berlin, 1787, and „Ḳohelet,“ 1788. He wrote a Hebrew commentary to Abot and also translated it, Vienna, 1791; „Reden der Erbauung Gebildeten Israeliten Gewidmet,“ Berlin, 1815-17; „Moses Mendelssohn, von Ihm und über Ihn,“ ib. 1819; „Ueber die Verbesserung der Israeliten im Königreich Polen,“ ib. 1819, this being the answer which he wrote to the Bishop of Kujawia; „Beiträge zur Geschichte der Judenverfolgung im XIX. Jahrhundert Durch Schriftsteller,“ ib. 1820.

Deutsch: Stolperstein, Margarete Friedländer, ...

Deutsch: Stolperstein, Margarete Friedländer, Giesebrechtstraße 10, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Deutschland English: „stumbling block“, Margarete Friedländer, Giesebrechtstraße 10, Berlin-Charlottenburg, Germany Koordinate: 52°30′4″N 13°18′42″E / °S °W / ; latd>90 (dms format) in latd latm lats longm longs (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Friedländer was assessor of the Royal College of Manufacture and Commerce of Berlin, and the first Jew to sit in the municipal council of that city. His wealth enabled him to be a patron of science and art, among those he encouraged being the brothers Alexander and Wilhelm von Humboldt.

Works

  • Lesebuch für jüdische Kinder, Nachdr. d. Ausg. Berlin, Voss, 1779 / neu hrsg. u. mit Einl. u. Anh. vers. von Zohar Shavit, Frankfurt am Main : dipa-Verl., 1990. ISBN 3-7638-0132-4
  • Übersetzung von Moses Mendelssohns Sefer ha-Nefesh. Berlin, 1787.
  • Übersetzung von Moses Mendelssohns Ḳohelet 1788.
  • David Friedländers Schrift: Ueber die durch die neue Organisation der Judenschaften in den preußischen Staaten nothwendig gewordene Umbildung 1) ihres Gottesdienstes in den Synagogen, 2) ihrer Unterrichts-Anstalten und deren Lehrgegenstände und 3) ihres Erziehungwesens überhaupt : Ein Wort zu seiner Zeit. – Neudr. nebst Anh. der Ausgabe Berlin, in Comm. bei W. Dieterici, 1812. Berlin: Verl. Hausfreund, 1934. (Beiträge zur Geschichte der Jüdischen Gemeinde zu Berlin / Stern.
  • Reden der Erbauung Gebildeten Israeliten Gewidmet Berlin, 1815-17.
  • Moses Mendelssohn, von Ihm und über Ihn Berlin, 1819.
  • Ueber die Verbesserung der Israeliten im Königreich Polen Berlin, 1819.
  • Beiträge zur Geschichte der Judenverfolgung im XIX. Jahrhundert Durch Schriftsteller Berlin, 1820.

Notes and references

  1. ^ a b Amos Elon: The Pity of It All: A History of the Jews in Germany, 1743-1933 (Metropolitan Books, 2002) ISBN 0-8050-5964-4 pp.73-75
 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainJewish Encyclopedia. 1901–1906. [1] by Isidore Singer and A. Kurrein.
  • Lowenstein, Steven M.:The Jewishness of David Friedländer and the crisis of Berlin Jewry. Ramat-Gan, Israel: Bar-Ilan Univ., 1994. (Braun lectures in the history of the Jews in Prussia ; no. 3)
  • Friedlander, David, Schleiermacher, Friedrich, and Teller, Wilhelm Abraham: A Debate on Jewish Emancipation and Christian Theology in Old Berlin. Crouter, Richard and Klassen, Julie (eds. and translators) Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing Co., 2004.

Bibliography of Jewish Encyclopedia article

  • I. Ritter, Gesch. der Jüdischen Reformation, ii., David Friedländer;
  • Ludwig Geiger, in Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, vii.;
  • Fuenn, Keneset Yisrael, pp. 250 et seq.;
  • Rippner, in Gratz Jubelschrift, pp. 162 et seq.;
  • Sulamith, viii. 109 et seq.;
  • Der Jüdische Plutarch, ii. 56-60;
  • Museum für die Israelitische Jugend, 1840;
  • Zeitschrift für die Geschichte der Juden in Deutschland, i. 256-273.

External links

See also

1771 ließ sich David Friedländer in Berlin nieder. Als Schwiegersohn des Bankiers Daniel Itzig und Freund von Moses Mendelssohn fand er schnell Anschluss in der Berliner Gesellschaft. Er engagierte sich für die Emanzipation der Berliner Juden und für verschiedene Reformprojekte. Friedrich Wilhelm II. berief ihn zusammen mit Daniel Itzig in ein Komitee über die Rechte der Juden, das ohne Ergebnis blieb. Ein weiteres Projekt war die Reform des jüdischen Gottesdienstes, dieser Vorschlag wurde jedoch als radikal abgelehnt.

Erfolgreich war aber die Gründung der jüdischen Freischule Chevrat Chinuch Ne’arim (Gesellschaft für Knabenerziehung) in Berlin 1778, für die Friedländer auch Schulbücher verfasste und das hebräische Gebetsbuch ins Deutsche übersetzte.

Friedländer bemühte sich um praktische Formen der Konvergenz (Paul) zwischen Judentum und Christentum. In diesem Sinne gab es 1799 „von jüdischer Seite in Berlin eine atemberaubende Initiative“ (Jobst Paul). Anonym richtete Friedländer ein Sendschreiben von einigen Hausvätern jüdischer Religion an Wilhelm Abraham Teller, in dem praktische Vorschläge für den „Versuch einer Glaubensvereinigung“[2] von Judentum und Protestantismus gemacht wurden. „Für die Juden reklamierte er dazu die Befreiung vom Jesus-Glauben und von einigen Riten, während er eine Taufe in jenem nicht-dogmatischen Sinn für möglich hielt, den Teller in seinen Schriften umrissen hatte. Christentum und Judentum teilten eine gemeinsame, natürliche Religion, für die Rituale keine Bedeutung hätten (er nennt sie ‚Werkheiligkeit, Wortkram und leeren Tand‘). Der Vorstoß war nicht erfolgreich, es folgte ein vielstimmiges, kontroverses Echo und einige brachten Friedländer sogar ins charakterliche Zwielicht, als habe er die Gleichstellung erkaufen wollen. Es war aber wohl – zuallererst – ein praktischer Vorstoß, der unter Berliner Verhältnissen in der Luft lag, aber er war nicht der letzte.“[3]

Friedländer betätigte sich außerdem als Förderer von Wissenschaft und Kunst, zu den Geförderten zählen Alexander und Wilhelm von Humboldt.

Er legte auch die Basis der bedeutenden Münzsammlung seines Sohnes Benoni Friedländer (1773–1858), welche dieser 1861 dem neugegründeten Münzkabinett übermachte, dessen Direktor seit 1854 sein jüngster Enkel Julius Friedländer war.

Sein zweiter Sohn Moses Friedländer (1774–1840) gründete gemeinsam mit Joseph Mendelssohn das Bankhaus Mendelssohn & Co.. (Josephs Schwägerin Lea und Regina Friedländer, beide geborene Salomon, sind Cousinen). Hauptsächlich war er Kaufmann der Friedländischen Tuch- und Seidenhandlung in der Burgstrasse 25, dem Palais Itzig, später auch einer Farbenhandlung, die ab 1806 von Jakob Herz Beer weitergeführt wurde.

Schriften

  • Lesebuch für jüdische Kinder. Nachdr. d. Ausg. Berlin, Voss, 1779 / neu hrsg. u. mit Einl. u. Anh. vers. von Zohar Shavit, dipa-Verl., Frankfurt am Main 1990, ISBN 3-7638-0132-4.
  • Übersetzung von Moses Mendelssohns Sefer ha-Nefesh. Berlin 1787.
  • Übersetzung von Moses Mendelssohns Ḳohelet. 1788.
  • David Friedländers Schrift: Ueber die durch die neue Organisation der Judenschaften in den preußischen Staaten nothwendig gewordene Umbildung 1) ihres Gottesdienstes in den Synagogen, 2) ihrer Unterrichts-Anstalten und deren Lehrgegenstände und 3) ihres Erziehungwesens überhaupt : Ein Wort zu seiner Zeit. – Neudr. nebst Anh. der Ausgabe Berlin, in Comm. bei W. Dieterici, 1812. Verl. Hausfreund, Berlin 1934. (Beiträge zur Geschichte der Jüdischen Gemeinde zu Berlin / Stern.
  • Reden der Erbauung. Gebildeten Israeliten Gewidmet. Berlin 1815-17.
  • Moses Mendelssohn, von Ihm und über Ihn. Berlin 1819.
  • Ueber die Verbesserung der Israeliten im Königreich Polen. Berlin 1819.
  • Beiträge zur Geschichte der Judenverfolgung im XIX. Jahrhundert Durch Schriftsteller. Berlin 1820.

Literatur

  • Ernst Fraenkel: David Friedländer und seine Zeit. In: Zeitschrift für die Geschichte der Juden in Deutschland. Heft 2/1936.
  • Ellen Littmann: Versuch einer Glaubensvereinigung auf der Basis der Aufklärung. David Friedländers Sendschreiben an den Probst Teller. In: C.V.-Zeitung Nr. 15, 1934, 3. Beiblatt.[4]
  • Heinz Kremers, Julius H. Schoeps (Hrsg.): Das jüdisch-christliche Religionsgespräch. Stuttgart, Bonn 1988.
  • Steven M. Lowenstein: The Jewishness of David Friedländer and the crisis of Berlin Jewry.Bar-Ilan Universität, Ramat-Gan, Israel 1994. (Braun lectures in the history of the Jews in Prussia, Nr. 3).
  • Michael A. Meyer: David Friedländer. Das Dilemma eines Schülers. In: Michael A. Meyer: Von Moses Mendelssohn zu Leopolod Zunz. Jüdische Identität in Deutschland 1749–1824. München 1994, S.66–98.
  • Jobst Paul: Das ‚Konvergenz’-Projekt – Humanitätsreligion und Judentum im 19. Jahrhundert. In: Margarete Jäger, Jürgen Link (Hrsg.): Macht – Religion – Politik. Zur Renaissance religiöser Praktiken und Mentalitäten. Münster 2006.
  • Immanuel Heinrich Ritter: David Friedländer. Sein Leben und sein Wirken im Zusammenhange mit den gleichzeitigen Culturverhältnissen und Reformbestrebungen im Judenthum. Peiser, Berlin 1861.

Siehe auch

Weblinks

Quellen

  1. Christoph Schulte: Die jüdische Aufklärung. Beck, München 2002, S. 94
  2. Der Begriff stammte von Julius H. Schoeps (1988)
  3. Jobst Paul (2006)
  4. Jobst Paul (2006)

Ein Gedanke zu “David Friedländer

Lesen Sie KARL MARX - Zur Judenfrage... und Sie werden staunen, was ein Jude über die Juden so schreibt...

Trage deine Daten unten ein oder klicke ein Icon um dich einzuloggen:

WordPress.com-Logo

Du kommentierst mit Deinem WordPress.com-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Twitter-Bild

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Twitter-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Facebook-Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Facebook-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Google+ Foto

Du kommentierst mit Deinem Google+-Konto. Abmelden / Ändern )

Verbinde mit %s